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We are a multidisciplinary innovation studio working with diverse partners to understand sustainability challenges and identify holistic, resilient solutions, and we are committed to training the next generation of leaders.

Blog

Insights, inspiration and opportunities to create a more vibrant and resilient future.

Filtering by Tag: Science

This Week in History

Peter Toth

I’ve written previously about the recent privatization of space exploration, and companies like Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin continue to capture headlines. However, publicly-funded, research-driven space exploration is still going strong, as NASA plans for the May 5 launch of InSight, a Mars mission that will measure the planet’s tectonic activity for the first time.

This Week in History

Peter Toth

Published at the dawn of the Cold War in 1946, the Acheson-Lilienthal Report proposed a collaborative, international approach to share the benefits, and mitigate the threats, of nuclear energy. Its eventual abandonment gives it a melancholic subtext, but its authors’ foresight is inspiring, and a worthy reminder that humanity's most pressing challenges require both global and long-term thinking.

This Week In History

Peter Toth

Privatization of government-run services, from education to infrastructure, has been an ongoing trend in recent decades, and SpaceX continued it by successfully launching a private rocket in 2008. Robert Frost, a NASA instructor and flight controller, aptly explains of the pros and cons of this shift here, and alludes to the tensions between of public good and private profit that are a root cause of many complex challenges.

How to Respond?

Peter Nicholson

Considering My Place
The light got weird. Like some sort of cosmic score, a solar eclipse “at totality" transcends words. Yet for me, the bizarre, light-dark quality of illumination before and after the two-minute period of full coverage almost overshadowed the main event. Afterward, I found my motivation to do just about anything else zapped. Thrust in the stark presence of that much greater than myself, I’m forced to acknowledge my inconsequentiality.

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This Week In History

Peter Toth

June 14 is a special day in the history of computing: Charles Babbage proposed his difference engine to the Royal Astronomical Society in 1822, and UNIVAC 1 was dedicated for service to the US Census Bureau in 1951. While we probably take their importance for granted today, the development of these devices was indispensable to better understanding and managing complexity.